Thursday, November 11, 2004

Top 100 News Words

Top 100 News Words



See the top 100 news words



Via J.D. Lasica's New Media Musings, Steve Rubel's Micro Persuasion and David Krane's kraneland... we are ten-by-tenned at 10x10, a unique new way of pictorially presenting the top 100 news stories - hourly - ranked by a linguistic analysis of the top 100 words used by selected news media in their RSS feeds. As written at 10x10:



Every hour, 10x10 scans the RSS feeds of several leading international news sources, and performs an elaborate process of weighted linguistic analysis on the text contained in their top news stories. After this process, conclusions are automatically drawn about the hour's most important words. The top 100 words are chosen, along with 100 corresponding images, culled from the source news stories. At the end of each day, month, and year, 10x10 looks back through its archives to conclude the top 100 words for the given time period. In this way, a constantly evolving record of our world is formed, based on prominent world events, without any human input.



The 10x10 scrollbar looks like a world champion.

Ubiquity the Key in the Internet Age

Ubiquity the Key in the Internet Age



Jeremy Zawodny has quite a long posting on



Ubiquity in the Internet Age.



Zawodny claims that "ubiquity" is the key to winning the internet battle:



"The Internet is the new medium and it has the effect of leveling the playing field. While this isn't a new insight, let me say it in two specific ways:



1. The web enables infinite distribution of content without any special effort or infrastructure.

2. The web extends the reach of our apps and services as far as we're willing to let them go.



Both notions come back to ubiquity. If your stuff (and your brand) is everywhere, you win. The money will follow. It always does....



What to do? ...



1. do something useful really really well

2. put the user in control by allowing access to your data and services in an easy and unrestricted way

3. share the wealth "




For example, Zawodny uses Google's Blogger as an example of a company which does all three.



But of course, there are also technical requirements as well.



Interesting to note in this regard is the October 25, 2004 article, "The Road To Ubiquity" by David Haskin, Mobile Pipeline, InternetWeek, which outlines three requirements for wireless technologies becoming "winners":



"First, hardware must become readily available that handles them all. Second, mobile-access bundles that give users two or more of these wireless options are necessary, or enterprises and consumers won't be able to make heads nor tails out of all the connectivity choices. Third, Wi-Fi hotspot and wireless-broadband vendors must offer widespread roaming agreements."



But, caveat emptor. There is a dark side to ubiquity. Via TechnoTaste (Anthropology, Technology, Food and Wine) and the posting "Internet Withdrawal and Internet Ubiquity" we are led to Lester Haines at the Register and his 23 September 2004 article "Internet junkies in chilling cold turkey experiment", which shows that internet ubiquity can also lead to internet addiction.



Crossposted to LawPundit.

Infothought - Geolocation, the Influence of Blogs, the DMCRA

Infothought - Geolocation, the Influence of Blogs, the DMCRA



Infothought's Seth Finkelstein has a very interesting posting regarding his expert declaration in the case of Nitke v. Ashcroft, especially regarding the possibility and accuracy of determining the geolocation of website visitors. If persons are not actively trying to hide their geolocation, that geolocation can be determined fairly closely by websites such as IP2LOCATION - but not always accurately enough for criminal purposes. Try it out on your own location by clicking that link. On the other hand, if persons are trying to hide their geolocation, they are able to do so, according to Seth's expert declaration.



Seth's Infothought blog (which covers "DMCA, Google, censorware, and an inside view of net-politics") has many other interesting topics, including a posting which calculates that ordinary blogs have little political influence. We agree.



Another informative read in the intellectual property area is Seth's material about the DMCRA (The Digital Media Consumers' Rights Act). See here for a short summary of the act, for the bill itself, and for the hearing on the bill.



The hearing has informative material on the debate about copyright protection and the right to copy CDs, DVDs and software with statements by

LAWRENCE LESSIG, PROFESSOR OF LAW, STANFORD LAW SCHOOL; GARY J. SHAPIRO, PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, CONSUMER ELECTRONICS ASSOCIATION; JACK VALENTI, PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, MOTION PICTURE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA; ROBERT W. HOLLEYMAN, PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, BUSINESS SOFTWARE ALLIANCE; HON. AL SWIFT, COLLING MURPHY; AND MIRIAM M. NISBET, LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL, AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION.

First Felony Conviction for a Spammer

First Felony Conviction for a Spammer



As reported in

PC World



the first felony conviction for a spammer was made in Virginia under a Virginia law which took effect in 2003.



"The Virginia Computer Crimes Act's new antispam provisions make it the toughest such law in the United States, according to the governor's office.



Why Virginia?



Virginia Governor Mark Warner was quoted in 2003 as saying:



" 'Half the world's Internet traffic passes through the Commonwealth of Virginia, so it is appropriate that we give our prosecutors tools to go after this costly and annoying crime,' Warner said in a statement. 'Before this law, legal action was almost not worth the trouble for prosecutors--which is no message to send to our Internet industry in its fight against the spam invasion.' "



Without such rightfully draconic laws, there is also no way to protect the consumer, which should be the main consideration.

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