Friday, September 14, 2012

The History of Electronic Display Organization Including Scrolling

Douglas Engelbart, the man who invented the mouse, got nothing, while billions of dollars are being gifted to some company for banal bounce-back scrolling having next to nothing to do with the basic functions of a gadget and you wonder if the patent system is broken????

The History of Electronic Display Organization Including Scrolling

The Engadget article by Benjamin Weiss at Xerox Alto-Spot von 1972: "It's okay, we're only human" has an accompanying Xerox Parc video [embedded below], where the user at the start of the video scrolls his emails using an arrow cursor. It is very clear that Apple did not invent scrolling or anything else you see in that video. How much does that leave for Apple to invent that is not "obvious" or anticipated by "prior art"?


Steve Wozniak talks about Pirates of Silicon Valley
("truthful", with added drama, he says)



Jobs was a monopolist and worried about competition,
Woz said you won by better technology
see Woz at 7:17


see Woz at 7:17

Jobs envisioned the commercial future of personal computers,
but he was a tweaker, not an inventor.
Jobs saw where money was to be made
and hired the right people to tweak already existing inventions.

From the Wikipedia, we repeat below the largely undisputed facts -- materials in brackets added by LawPundit:

Apple Lisa
"[Starting in 1973 and][s]everal years prior to [Apple (founded in 1976) and the Apple Lisa 1978], research had been going on at Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center to create a new way to organize everything on the screen, today known as the desktop. Steve Jobs visited Xerox PARC in 1979. He was excited by the revolutionary mouse-driven GUI of the Xerox Alto and was keen to use these ideas back at Apple. By late 1979, Jobs successfully negotiated with Xerox for his Lisa team to receive two demonstrations of ongoing research projects at Xerox PARC; when the Apple team saw the demonstration of the Alto computer they were able to see in action the basic elements of what constituted a workable GUI. A great deal of work was put into making the graphical interface into a mainstream commercial product by the Lisa team."
Xerox Alto
"The Xerox Alto was one of the first computers designed for individual use (though not as a home computer), making it arguably what is now called a personal computer. It was developed at Xerox PARC in 1973. It was the first computer to use the desktop metaphor and mouse-driven graphical user interface (GUI)."

EVERYTHING you see there was NOT invented by Apple. It is all PRIOR ART.

Take a look at the discussion about Apple scrolling at IXDA.org, especially the contributions of Larry Tessler, where he starts out as follows:
"The original Lisa and Mac vertical scroll arrows were at the top and bottom of the vertical scroll bar, and the up-pointing arrow moved the content down. I ran a user study in the early days of Lisa development that informed that design."
The entire discussion there shows that the details of "scrolling" were decisions based on how users wanted or would want scrolling to function. It was a user preference question. There was nothing there about patenting some sort of non-obvious patentable "invention" not anticipated by prior art, and the same is true for the current rubber-band scrolling bounce-back of text from the edge of a display. That kind of thing is nothing more than a child's play gimmick, having next to nothing to do with the basic functioning of any gadget.

Postscript to the above: Prior Art in Infinity One

As an AMATEUR programmer, in the role-playing game Infinity One, which I first programmed as a hobby in my spare time using STOS for Atari, a game which I subsequently converted to Microsoft Windows and put on the market in 1993, whenever a character tried to go through a wall as the "limit" of the player's progress on the game screen cut-out, I programmed the wall to "shake", accompanied by a "boing" sound.

That was not only easy child's play programming but also served as prior art for similar ideas on handling any limit of space on a display. The idea that doing virtually the same thing with a text list today brings a company billions of dollars in windfall profits is simply unfathomable to any sane individual.

Infinity One was registered as a Windows-Compatible program with Microsoft, who should thus have the source code in its archives. I can not imagine the source code of Apple being much different. It is simply animation in principle, moving bitmaps or other information data around. There are surely many games that did this before me, i.e. doing some kind of a bounce upon reaching limits of a predefined display section. Nothing new under the sun.


SEO Search Statistics and Not Provided Keywords as Pitfalls via Encrypted Searches, plus Browser Suggestions

Paul North has the scoop on data analysis and search reporting and
the impact of "not provided" keywords because of encrypted searches
(e.g. as reported in The Register, Firefox 14 in July introduced encrypted HTTPS Google search as the default).

See the SEO Blog in
3 Google Analytics Traps Caused By (Not Provided) Keyword Data.

One of the major problems in Mozilla Firefox in its recent editions, by the way, is the programmers not giving USERS the OPTION to select what they want but rather pushing their ideas forcibly on an often misinformed or uninformed public. It is a strategy that reminds of parents telling their children they know what is best for them, regardless of the actual results, and is a philosophy destined to slowly erode the Firefox user base.

We are quite prepared for an alternative search engine to Firefox that puts the USERS first, not the programmers.

Obviously, we have no use for Google Chrome or Internet Explorer, which permit virtually no customization and  are made for infrequent Internet users who have little conception of what they are doing except surfing aimlessly. Similarly, Opera is way behind in permitting USER customization.

I want -- and this is essential -- ANY new page to be opened in a new tab. The failure of browsers to do this often means that material in an opened tab -- e.g. an email -- is irretrievably lost if some link or search uses the same tab. That all browser makers have not comprehended this is a mystery.

I want to be able to place my tabs BELOW all the rest of the stuff at the the top of the screen. I definitely do not want tabs above the menu. I want what I AM DOING and working on to be in the foreground, not what some programmers have done or what some company wants me to see.

I want to be able to install add-ons that give me different colored tabs for each tab and a special marking of the open tab. I want to be able to close tabs at any time EITHER directly at the tab OR by a "close tab" button at the end of the tab bar -- the reason for the latter is that when you are doing research on a given topic and have dozens of pages open about that topic, and then finish that topic, you close tabs fast from the "close tab" button at the right, closing tabs in order right to left until you get to the previous tabs you want to keep.

I want to be able to put ANY and ALL icons of my choice in the command menus, ANYWHERE, as I want them to be and not as the programmers or companies want them to be.

I want a Google toolbar like the old style toolbar I have always used and know how to operate. The discontinuance of this toolbar is the main reason for me to switch from Firefox to another browser.

I want to be able to put toolbars where I want them on the screen, not in some predetermined order or placement.

I want to select my own background for the menus, or employ user-made skins.

Themes offered by browser makers should not only offer -- as many currently do -- themes that have the intellectual level of 10-year olds, but some attempt should be made to offer design offerings that reach toward an adult audience.




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